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Svyatoslav Silin
Svyatoslav Silin

Encyclopedia Of Global Archaeology


This multi-volume work provides a comprehensive and systematic coverage of archaeology that is unprecedented, not only in terms of the use of multi-media, but also in terms of content. It encompasses the breadth of the subject along with key aspects that are tapped from other disciplines. It includes all time periods and regions of the world and all stages of human development. Mostly importantly, this encyclopedia includes the knowledge of leading scholars from around the world.




Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology



The entries in this encyclopedia range from succinct summaries of specific sites and the scientific aspects of archaeological enquiry to detailed discussions of archaeological concepts, theories and methods, and from investigations into the social, ethical and political dimensions of archaeological practice to biographies of leading archaeologists from throughout the world. The different forms of archaeology are explored, along with the techniques used for each and the challenges, concerns and issues that face archaeologists today.


Dr. Smith's main field of research is Indigenous archaeology. While she has conducted fieldwork with Indigenous groups in Asia and North America, her primary research interest lies with the archaeology of art and of modern material practices, explored through fieldwork with Aboriginal people from the Barunga region of the Northern Territory, Australia. She conducts research into the reshaping and relocation of Indigenous knowledge, explored in collaboration with Ngadjuri people from South Australia.


This second edition of the multi-volume work goes beyond the comprehensive and systematic coverage of archaeology that appears in the first edition. The field of archaeology continues to grow and the collaborations between archaeologists and researchers in other areas - environmental studies, landscape studies, art history, demography, biomedicine, chemistry, museum specialists, etc. - continues to grow.


This second edition builds on the massive collection of information and research from the first edition by adding new entries as well as updating the existing entries. The entries in this encyclopedia range from succinct summaries of specific sites and the scientific aspects of archaeological enquiry to detailed discussions of archaeological concepts, theories and methods, and from investigations into the social, ethical and political dimensions of archaeological practice to biographies of leading archaeologists from throughout the world. The different forms of archaeology are explored, along with the techniques used for each and the challenges, concerns and issues that face archaeologists today.


This compendium is both a print reference and an online reference work. A major innovation of the encyclopedia is that it harnesses the capabilities of an online environment, enhancing both the presentation and dissemination of information. Most particularly, the continuous updating allowed by an online environment should ensure that the Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology is a definitive reference work for archaeology and archaeologists.


Claire Smith FSA, FAHA (born 15 July 1957) is an Australian archaeologist specialising in Indigenous archaeology, symbolic communication and rock art. She served as Dean (Research) of the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences at Flinders University in 2017-2018 and, prior to that, as head of the Department of Archaeology. She served two terms as president of the World Archaeological Congress from 2003 to 2014 and greatly increased the organization's size and visibility. Among her many publications is the Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology (Springer 2014, 2020).[1]


Smith obtained a bachelor's degree in archaeology from the University of New England in 1990, and a PhD from the same university in 1996. Her doctoral thesis was an ethnoarchaeological study of Australian Aboriginal art.[1] She also wrote a book called, "Decolonizing Indigenous Archaeology."[2] After that she held an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellowship.[citation needed]


Her scholarly output has largely focused on the relationship between archaeologists and indigenous communities, both in Australia and around the world. She has also given attention to general interests for teaching archaeology, such as her Archaeology to Delight and Instruct, and practicing it, such as Digging It Up Down Under. Her archaeological field methods textbook for introductory students has gone through two editions in Australia and was published in an American edition. Her interest in bringing heritage and community archaeology issues to public attention, particularly the plight of Aboriginal peoples in Australia, has led to a series of articles in the Australian news source The Conversation on these topics.[citation needed]


Black Trowel Collective. (2016, October 31). Foundations of an Anarchist Archaeology: A Community Manifesto. Savage Minds/Anthrodendrum. Retrieved December 1, 2016, from Savage Minds website: -of-an-anarchist-archaeology-a-community-manifesto/


The subdivisions of this guide are based on the curatorial sections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology. Therefore, sections specifically for Egyptian and Near Eastern archaeology are organized separately from the sections for archaeology in Africa and Asia. Information on prehistoric Aegean, Etruscan, Greek, and Roman archaeology is found in the section for "Mediterranean."


The Museum Library, located in the Academic Wing of the Penn Museum, is the University of Pennsylvania's branch library for anthropology and archaeology. With over 145,000 volumes on-site with historic strengths in biological and physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, archaeology worldwide, and Native American studies, it is one of the premier branch libraries for anthropology in the United States.


G. Richard Scott focuses on the dental anthropological analysis of Medieval European populations, with special emphasis on analysis of nonmetric crown and root traits, dental pathology, stress and cultural behavior. His continues to research on bioarchaeology of Alaskan Inuit populations and Greenlandic Norse.


Use this selection of print encyclopedias and dictionaries to find background information, overviews and key resources from bibliographies. Some are duplicated online; some are print only.


This suggests that Epipalaeolithic humans were interacting with late surviving archaic species in complex ways and using their remains for ceremonial purposes. In a global context, Maludong seems to be the only site providing clear evidence for the coexistence of diverse hominines in later human evolution, with evidence for interaction between late surviving archaic and modern humans within a window of 720 years.


Finally, our research at Maludong and Longlin has important implications for interpreting human fossils from other parts of East Asia including China and understanding patterns of human evolution during the later Pleistocene. With phylogenetic analysis suggesting the Maludong hominins diverged during the Middle Pleistocene, long before the appearance of modern H. sapiens, East Asia seems to have been inhabited by a range of late-surviving archaic species representing distinct evolutionary clades emerging over a period of more than a million years. This will have important implications for interpreting the diversity seen among the Pleistocene inhabitants of East Asia, and the development and testing of regional and global scenarios about human evolution. 041b061a72


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