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Learn Storyboarding for Animation, Film, and New Media with Exploring Storyboarding by Wendy Tumminello



Exploring Storyboarding: A Comprehensive Guide by Wendy Tumminello




Have you ever wondered how your favorite movies, animations, games, and commercials are made? How do the creators plan and visualize their stories before they become reality? The answer is storyboarding. Storyboarding is a technique that involves drawing a series of sketches to outline the scenes, shots, transitions, dialogue, and sound effects of a story. It is an essential tool for any storyteller who wants to communicate their vision effectively and efficiently.




exploring storyboarding wendy tumminello pdf download



In this article, we will explore the art and craft of storyboarding, with the help of a renowned expert in the field: Wendy Tumminello. We will learn what storyboarding is, why it is important, who Wendy Tumminello is, what her book "Exploring Storyboarding" is about, and how to download the PDF version of the book for free. We will also cover some basic concepts, types, processes, techniques, and tips for creating successful storyboards. By the end of this article, you will have a solid foundation for your own storyboarding projects.


Introduction




What is storyboarding and why is it important?




Storyboarding is a technique that originated in the film industry in the 1930s, when Walt Disney and his animators used it to plan their animated shorts. Since then, it has become a standard practice in many fields that involve storytelling, such as animation, live-action film, television, video games, advertising, web design, graphic novels, and more.


Storyboarding is important because it allows the storyteller to:



  • Organize their ideas and structure their narrative.



  • Visualize their scenes and shots in terms of composition, perspective, movement, timing, and rhythm.



  • Experiment with different options and alternatives without wasting time and resources.



  • Communicate their vision clearly and convincingly to others, such as clients, collaborators, producers, directors, actors, etc.



  • Test and refine their concepts before moving on to the production stage.



Who is Wendy Tumminello and what is her book about?




Wendy Tumminello is a professional storyboard artist who has worked on numerous projects for clients such as Disney, Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, PBS Kids, Discovery Channel, National Geographic, Scholastic, and more. She is also an instructor at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, where she teaches storyboarding and visual development courses.


Her book, "Exploring Storyboarding", is a comprehensive guide that covers everything you need to know about storyboarding, from the basics to the advanced techniques. It is divided into four parts:



  • Part One: Introduction to Storyboarding. This part introduces the history, definition, purpose, and applications of storyboarding, as well as the skills and tools required for the job.



  • Part Two: Storyboarding for Animation. This part focuses on the specific aspects of storyboarding for animation, such as the principles of animation, the types of animation, the genres and styles of animation, and the formats and conventions of animation storyboards.



  • Part Three: Storyboarding for Live Action. This part covers the differences and similarities between storyboarding for animation and live action, such as the camera techniques, the terminology, the genres and styles of live action, and the formats and conventions of live action storyboards.



  • Part Four: The Professional Storyboard Artist. This part provides practical advice on how to become a successful storyboard artist, such as how to create a portfolio, how to find work, how to work with clients and directors, how to collaborate with other artists, and how to deal with challenges and problems.



The book is filled with examples, exercises, tips, and insights from Wendy Tumminello's own experience and from other professionals in the industry. It is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to learn or improve their storyboarding skills.


How to download the PDF version of the book for free?




If you are interested in reading "Exploring Storyboarding" by Wendy Tumminello, you can download the PDF version of the book for free from this link: https://www.academia.edu/38566482/Exploring_Storyboarding. You will need to create an account or log in with your existing account on Academia.edu, a platform that allows researchers and academics to share their papers and books online. Once you have access to the PDF file, you can save it to your device or print it out for your convenience.


Storyboarding Basics




The elements of a storyboard




A storyboard is composed of several elements that work together to convey the story. These elements are:


Panels




Panels are the basic units of a storyboard. They are rectangular frames that contain drawings of the scenes or shots of the story. Each panel represents a single moment or action in the story. Panels are arranged in a sequential order, usually from left to right and top to bottom, to create a visual flow of the narrative.


Shots




Shots are the types of panels that show how the camera views the scene or shot. They can vary in size, angle, distance, and movement, depending on the effect or mood that the storyteller wants to create. Some common types of shots are:



  • Establishing shot: A wide or long shot that shows the location or setting of the scene or shot.



  • Close-up: A tight shot that shows a detail or a part of a character or object.



  • Medium shot: A shot that shows a character or object from waist up or down.



  • Over-the-shoulder shot: A shot that shows a character or object from behind another character's shoulder.



  • Point-of-view shot: A shot that shows what a character sees from their perspective.



  • Pan: A shot that moves horizontally from one side to another.



  • Tilt: A shot that moves vertically from up to down or vice versa.



  • Zoom: A shot that changes the size or distance of a character or object by moving the camera closer or farther away.



  • Dolly: A shot that moves the camera forward or backward along a track.



  • Track: A shot that moves the camera sideways along a track.



Transitions




Transitions are the ways that one panel changes to another. They can indicate changes in time, location, mood, or action. Some common types of transitions are:



  • Cut: A sudden change from one panel to another without any effect.



  • Fade: A gradual change from one panel to another by fading out or in.



  • Dissolve: A gradual change from one panel to another by overlapping them.



to another by sliding a line or shape across the screen.


  • Flash: A change from one panel to another by flashing a bright light or color.



  • Match cut: A change from one panel to another by matching a similar shape, color, or movement.



Dialogue and sound effects




Dialogue and sound effects are the words and sounds that accompany the panels. They can provide information, emotion, humor, or atmosphere to the story. Dialogue and sound effects are usually written in text boxes or balloons that are placed near the characters or objects that produce them. They can also be written in brackets or parentheses to indicate off-screen or non-diegetic sounds.


The types of storyboards




There are different types of storyboards that serve different purposes and audiences. Some common types of storyboards are:


Animatic




An animatic is a type of storyboard that is animated or timed to show the movement, timing, and rhythm of the story. It is usually accompanied by dialogue, sound effects, and music. An animatic is used to test and refine the story before moving on to the final animation.


Leica reel




A leica reel is a type of storyboard that is edited and synchronized with dialogue, sound effects, and music. It is similar to an animatic, but it does not show any movement or animation. A leica reel is used to pitch and present the story to clients, producers, or directors.


Thumbnail




A thumbnail is a type of storyboard that is drawn quickly and roughly to capture the essence and flow of the story. It is usually done in pencil or pen on small pieces of paper. A thumbnail is used to brainstorm and explore different ideas and options for the story.


Presentation




A presentation is a type of storyboard that is drawn neatly and clearly to show the final look and feel of the story. It is usually done in color on large sheets of paper or digital software. A presentation is used to showcase and sell the story to clients, producers, or directors.


The process of storyboarding




The process of storyboarding can vary depending on the type, style, and scope of the project. However, a general process can be summarized in four steps:


Script analysis




The first step is to analyze the script or the written version of the story. The storyboard artist reads and studies the script carefully, paying attention to the characters, settings, actions, dialogue, and tone of the story. The storyboard artist also identifies the main scenes, shots, transitions, and sound effects that are needed for the story.


Thumbnail sketching




The second step is to sketch out the thumbnails or rough drawings of the panels. The storyboard artist uses their imagination and creativity to visualize how each scene or shot will look like from the camera's point of view. The storyboard artist also experiments with different compositions, perspectives, movements, and angles to create dynamic and expressive panels.


Rough storyboard




The third step is to create a rough storyboard or a more detailed version of the thumbnails. The storyboard artist redraws and refines each panel, adding more details, clarity, and consistency. The storyboard artist also adds dialogue, sound effects, and notes to each panel to explain their choices and intentions.


Final storyboard




The fourth step is to produce a final storyboard or a polished version of the rough storyboard. The storyboard artist cleans up and colors each panel, making sure they are clear and attractive. The storyboard artist also checks for errors, gaps, or inconsistencies in the storyboard. The final storyboard is then ready to be presented or delivered to the client, producer, or director.


Storyboarding Techniques and Tips




How to create dynamic and expressive storyboards




Creating dynamic and expressive storyboards is not an easy task. It requires a lot of skill, practice, and experimentation. However, there are some techniques and tips that can help you improve your storyboarding skills. Here are some of them:


Use the rule of thirds




The rule of thirds is a compositional technique that divides the frame into nine equal parts by two horizontal and two vertical lines. The rule of thirds suggests that placing important elements along these lines or at their intersections creates a more balanced and interesting composition. The rule of thirds can help you avoid boring or static panels by creating focal points and visual interest.


Vary the camera angles and movements




Camera angles and movements are the ways that the camera views the scene or shot. They can create different effects or moods in the story. For example, a low angle can make a character look powerful or intimidating, while a high angle can make them look weak or vulnerable. A pan can show the scope or context of a scene, while a zoom can show the detail or emotion of a shot. Varying the camera angles and movements can help you avoid repetitive or dull panels by creating variety and contrast.


Show the character's emotions and actions




Character's emotions and actions are the ways that the character expresses their feelings and intentions in the story. They can reveal their personality, motivation, and relationship with other characters. For example, a smile can show happiness or friendliness, while a frown can show sadness or anger. A gesture can show agreement or disagreement, while a movement can show direction or speed. Showing the character's emotions and actions can help you avoid confusing or ambiguous panels by creating clarity and engagement.


Use contrast and lighting effects




Contrast and lighting effects are the ways that the light and dark values affect the scene or shot. They can create different atmospheres or tones in the story. For example, a bright light can create a warm or cheerful mood, while a dark shadow can create a cold or scary mood. A high contrast can create a dramatic or tense mood, while a low contrast can create a soft or calm mood. Using contrast and lighting effects can help you avoid flat or bland panels by creating depth and mood.


How to avoid common storyboarding mistakes




Storyboarding is not an easy task. It is common to make mistakes along the way. However, some mistakes can be avoided or corrected with some awareness and attention. Here are some of them:


Don't overcrowd the panels




Overcrowding the panels means putting too many elements or details in a single panel. This can make the panel look cluttered, confusing, or distracting. It can also make the panel lose its focus or impact. To avoid overcrowding the panels, you should use only the essential elements or details that are relevant to the story. You should also use negative space or empty areas to create balance and breathing room.


Don't be too vague or too detailed




Being too vague or too detailed means drawing the panels with too little or too much information. This can make the panel look unclear, incomplete, or inconsistent. It can also make the panel lose its purpose or meaning. To avoid being too vague or too detailed, you should draw the panels with enough information to convey the story effectively and efficiently. You should also use appropriate levels of detail depending on the type, style, and audience of the storyboard.


Don't ignore the continuity and logic of the story




Ignoring the continuity and logic of the story means drawing the panels with errors, gaps, or inconsistencies in the narrative. This can make the panel look illogical, unrealistic, or contradictory. It can also make the panel lose its coherence or credibility. To avoid ignoring the continuity and logic of the story, you should check and revise your panels for any mistakes or problems in terms of time, location, action, character, dialogue, sound effect, transition, etc.


Don't forget the audience and the purpose of the storyboard




the panels without considering who will see them and why they are made. This can make the panel look irrelevant, inappropriate, or ineffective. It can also make the panel lose its appeal or value. To avoid forgetting the audience and the purpose of the storyboard, you should keep in mind who your target audience is and what your goal or message is. You should also tailor your panels to suit their needs and expectations. Conclusion




Summary of the main points




In conclusion, storyboarding is a powerful technique that can help you plan and visualize your stories before they become reality. Storyboarding can help you organize your ideas, structure your narrative, experiment with different options, communicate your vision, and test and refine your concepts. Storyboarding can also help you create dynamic and expressive storyboards that capture the attention and emotion of your audience.


To create successful storyboards, you need to know the elements, types, processes, techniques, and tips of storyboarding. You also need to avoid common storyboarding mistakes and consider your audience and purpose. Moreover, you need to practice and learn from the experts in the field, such as Wendy Tumminello. Her book "Exploring Storyboarding" is a comprehensive guide that covers everything you need to know about storyboarding.


Call to action and recommendation




If you are interested in learning more about storyboarding or improving your storyboarding skills, we recommend you to download the PDF version of "Exploring Storyboarding" by Wendy Tumminello for free from this link: https://www.academia.edu/38566482/Exploring_Storyboarding. You will find a wealth of information, examples, exercises, tips, and insights from Wendy Tumminello and other professionals in the industry.


We hope you enjoyed this article and learned something new and useful about storyboarding. We also hope you will apply what you learned to your own storyboarding projects and share them with us. We would love to see your work and give you feedback. Thank you for reading and happy storyboarding!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about storyboarding:



  • What is the difference between a storyboard and a script?



A storyboard is a visual representation of a script or a written version of a story. A storyboard shows how the scenes, shots, transitions, dialogue, and sound effects of a story will look like from the camera's point of view. A script shows what the characters say and do in a story using words.


  • What are some examples of storyboards?



Some examples of storyboards are:


  • The storyboard for "The Lion King" by Disney: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4v7sXaB5qJo



  • The storyboard for "The Matrix" by The Wachowskis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69O4PXzAQ5Y



  • The storyboard for "The Simpsons" by Matt Groening: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8er83V2OJ1o



  • What are some tools or software for creating storyboards?



Some tools or software for creating storyboards are:


  • Pencil and paper: The traditional and simple way of creating storyboards.



  • Photoshop: A popular and versatile software for creating digital drawings and paintings.



  • Storyboarder: A free and easy-to-use software for creating professional-looking storyboards.



  • Toon Boom Storyboard Pro: A powerful and comprehensive software for creating animated and interactive storyboards.



  • How long does it take to create a storyboard?



The time it takes to create a storyboard depends on many factors, such as the type, style, scope, complexity, quality, and deadline of the project. It also depends on the skill, experience, speed, and workflow of the storyboard artist. However, a general estimate is that it takes about one hour to create one minute of storyboard.


  • How much does a storyboard artist earn?



The salary of a storyboard artist varies depending on their location, industry, experience, and reputation. However, a general estimate is that the average salary of a storyboard artist in the United States is about $65,000 per year.


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